Gift Giving

Once I was shopping in a designer store, a petite woman in front of me, was trying to do an exchange. She claimed she received the blouse as a gift and her friend who gifted her, had told her that she could exchange the blouse to her desired size in that particular store. I couldn’t help but follow the conversation between her and the woman at the register as they were talking loudly.

Now, here is the funny part: the blouse looked as big as size 16 and the woman’s size couldn’t be larger than 8. The sales associate at the register told the woman that she couldn’t proceed with an exchange because the item was not purchased in that store (possibly an outlet, where all sales are final). The customer was not very happy as she was leaving the store. Was the unhappiness due to the fact that her friend didn’t have any idea about her size, not even close or was it because she couldn’t exchange the wrong sized item?

I have a pretty good eye for size. I can buy gifts for my loved ones living in distance, just by looking at their pics and they would fit perfectly.

When you give a personal gift, such as clothes, wouldn’t it be a good idea to have an approximate idea of size? Or not give at all and buy another gift, something that can be treasured without going through the hustle and bustle of exchanges. We should also remember all hard working sales people in the stores, who are heavily burdened during the hectic holiday hours. I must admit sometimes I think the sales people are angels with utmost patience as some customers can be so unreasonable.

When we give gifts, wouldn’t it be wonderful to give them with love and not just for the sake of giving a gift?

We shouldn’t consume in the name of love. We should be creative and thoughtful in the name of gift giving.

Maggie's Rose
Pat Austin Rose ~ grown by Maggie Rawlinson.
PHOTO CREDIT:
Jon Rawlinson

Poor Service + Bad Coffee = No Thanks!

Every decision we make is emotionally based. We make friends because it’s the inner bond that draws us together, not the words spoken. We purchase a product because it brings us some level of joy.

I had a bizarre, actually two bizarre experiences lately. Some people would call me a coffee snob. I don’t drink much coffee outside my home but when I do, I like to visit my favorite coffee houses. I am not going to name them here and only call them coffee house A and B. Two weeks ago, as I was waiting for my husband to finish his workday, I popped in coffee house A. I drink black, bold, strong coffee. I ordered a cup and before that I asked if the coffee was freshly brewed. The guy at the counter shook his head, nodding as to assure me it was fresh. I sat down, started playing with my iPad and I am sure I would have spit it out if it was not for my new iPad. The coffee was awful. Not only it was not strong, it was at least a couple of hours old coffee. When I told the guy at the register, he just looked at me as if there was nothing he could do.

My second experience in my other favorite coffee house B was quite similar. At this time, I was certain that those who worked at both coffee houses, simply didn’t care whether the customer was content or they were simply saving money for their employer.

One morning, I stopped at another coffee house (which I will call here, coffee house C). There were two smiling, enthusiastic girls behind the counter. I told them that I wanted a cup of fresh, bold, strong coffee. One of them assured me that they would brew new coffee for me. Both were upbeat and very welcoming. Now, this coffee house C is not my favorite coffee place yet I loved the coffee there that morning. Great customer service should never be underestimated. It’s what keeps us coming back.

Next time, when I want to have a cup of coffee, I am heading to coffee house C. I still remember those two girls’ kind smiling faces.

I know now that I prefer coffee with kindness.

Maggie's garden

PHOTO CREDIT: Maggie Rawlinson

Mayor Cory Booker ~ Food stamp challenge

“Our task must be to free ourselves…by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and it’s beauty.” ~Albert Einstein

Mayor of Newark, NJ, Cory Booker is helping to create the spiritual revolution. Today, Mr. Booker started the food stamp Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) challenge, A Movement Toward Food Justice!

For one entire week, he’ll be living on $30 of groceries to raise awareness about how challenging it is to live on food stamps.

This afternoon, the Newark Mayor tweeted his #SNAPchallenge food for the week:


Note: NO Coffee

Mr.Booker who is a vegetarian, continues to inspire us all.

Watch this video to learn the #SNAPchallenge guidelines:

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