Are our electronics messing with how birds navigate?

“The reason birds can fly and we can’t is simply because they have perfect faith, for to have faith is to have wings.” ―J.M. Barrie

I love birds. If you ask me: “What would you like to be reincarnated as?”
My answer would be: I would love to come back as a bird. I would fly anywhere, high, far and wide to explore new places.

The majority of the bird species are migratory. They migrate either for food or new nesting locations. Escaping the cold is another factor yet birds and even hummingbirds can withstand freezing temperatures as long they have enough food supply.

Birds can travel several thousand miles annually. They often travel the same course year after year. They have excellent navigational skills and homing instinct which allows them to always return to the same area. They may migrate halfway around the world yet they will always return home. Many explanations about their navigational skills have been proposed throughout the years. Whether it’s their sense of smell, their ability to use the earth’s magnetic field or the internal compass that guides birds to migrate brilliantly, birds are absolutely fascinating. One thing is certain that they are highly sensitive to certain frequencies.

The article “Radio Signals Skew Birds’ Internal Navigation“ says:
“Migrating birds may lose their way when exposed to the electromagnetic noise from radio signals and electronic devices, researchers have found.”

While we humans enjoy tweeting and face-booking, our electronics are messing with how birds navigate. It’s frightening that the signals of our cities could be disrupting the bird migration (electromagnetic fields from electronics such as computers, printers, refrigerators).

Although there is no definitive scientific proof that humans are affected by electromagnetic noise, more research is needed to disregard the health effects (and the phrase: “technology makes me sick”).

More on the subject:
Man-Made Electromagnetic Noise Disrupts a Bird’s Compass

 

                                            PHOTO CREDIT: SHI